“War means fighting, and fighting means killing.” Does war not mean remembering all equally who took part in it? Rest in Peace and respect to you all.

 

Imperial War Museum 

http://www.iwm.org.uk/

Armed Forces Muslim Association

Why India needs to remember 'forgotten' fallen of world wars

Basra, Iraq

  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-36801602?SThisFB 

Click above

The First Indian to win Victoria Cross……

http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205184432

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-one/11199649/First-Muslim-to-be-awarded-Victoria-Cross-needs-recognition-say-former-Army-chiefs.html

 

Notably, here was the later recommendation for another such award, due to go to Subedan Ghulam Haidar, who commanded the 130th Baluchis, for his bravery to save General Malleson on May 5, 1915 at the expense of his own life “overlooked” and never ratified, since then a badge of shame for many on the British Armed Forces to have so blatantly shafted aside Haidar’s sacrifice, long suspected to be entirely due to his origin and nothing at all to do with his bravery.

http://www.eturbonews.com/29871/battlefield-east-africa-98-years-and-counting

 

Medals of Honour

http://www.emel.com/article?id=65&a_id=2197

Muslim contribution to Britain during WW1 (1914 - 1918)

Published on 21 Jun 2016

Almost 700,000 Muslims Soldiers contributed Britain and the Allies during World War (WW 1) 1914 - 1918
From recruitment to burial, the exhibition developed by the British Muslim Heritage Centre (BMHC) gives an insight into the selfless sacrifice of Muslim soldiers, who valiantly fought for the freedoms and privileges that we take for granted in Great Britain and Europe today.
Complete with a virtual library, lesson plans and a toolkit for schools, this exhibition is the first long-term exhibition of its kind, devoted solely to exemplifying the Muslim community’s contribution and sacrifices during WW1.
Located in the heart of a diverse and developing Manchester, it will provide a stimulating platform from which to discuss and celebrate Muslim identity, belonging and contribution, not only to the region, but to the United Kingdom as a whole.
400,000 Muslim Soldiers from India fought for Britain in WW1, in addition to a further 280,000 Algerians, Moroccans and Tunisians who fought for the allies. At least 89,000 Muslims were recorded as having given their lives for this country
It is a little known fact that 20% of British Empire recruits were actually Muslims. What an unbelievable commitment and sacrifice. We British owe a lot to these forgotten heroes.
At a time when the Muslim Community is continually in the media spotlight, with some in society calling into question their loyalty to ‘British values’ and to the British way of life, this initiative will go a long way to finding some tough but common ground.

Click above

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Political, Military and Religious leaders pay tribute to the sacrifices made by Muslims for Britain in the two world wars.

http://www.emel.com/article?id=65&a_id=2199

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World War I: GP plans memorial to honour nearly half a million Muslim soldiers who fought for Britain.

MUSLIM SOLDIERS Click above

Approximately 1.3 million Indian soldiers served in World War One, and over 74,000 of them lost their lives. World War two there were 2.5 million Indian men in August 1945 and over 87,000 Indian soldiers died. Serving in divisions of infantry, armour and a fledgling airborne force, they fought on three continents in Africa, Europe and Asia. But history has mostly forgotten these sacrifices, which were rewarded with broken promises of Indian independence from the British government, Gurkhas made approximate 15%, Sikhs who happen to make up between 16 and 20% of the British Indian Army have always worn turbans on religious grounds from day one and the rest apart from Sikhs, who made up the other 80% to 84% are also seen wearing turbans have been seen wearing on cultural grounds from day one, because their tradition demanded so, and that goes from a Muslim Balochi, Muslim/Hindu Rajput, Muslim Afghans, Muslim Pathans and so on …Equally all must be honoured, recognised and remembered…..

 

Glimpses of some of the Muslim contribution and sacrifices……

The 40th Pathans…. The 40th Pathans fought with great gallantry in the Second Battle of Ypres. The Baloch Regiment, 129th Duke of Connaught's Own Baluchis - India, France, German East Africa. 130th King George's Own Baluchis (Jacob's Rifles) - India, German East Africa, Palestine.

The ‘forgotten’ army of 400,000 Muslim soldiers who fought in Great War trenches for Britain

https://historyandsoon.wordpress.com/2015/10/25/the-forgotten-army-of-400000-muslim-soldiers-who-fought-in-great-war-trenches-for-britain/

 

Muslims Contribution to the World Wars

 

http://www.mcb.org.uk/british-muslims/

 

http://www.libertygb.org.uk/news/did-muslims-fight-britain-both-world-wars

 

http://www.middleeasteye.net/news/muslim-soldiers-world-war-i-allies-533439783

 

http://ww1muslimsoldiers.org.uk

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/azeem-ibrahim/how-muslims-won-the-secon_b_5202541.html

 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?

 

client=opera&q=Muslims+contribution+to+United+Kingdom+in+wars.&sourceid=opera&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

 

I AM BRITISH. I AM MUSLIM. I AM A SOLDIER.

http://afma.org.uk/

 

https://www.facebook.com/ArmedForcesMuslimAssociation/

 

Muslim Stats

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/reality-check/2015/dec/11/donald-trump-needs-check-facts-british-muslims-isis

 

http://www.open.ac.uk/ccig/blogs/british-muslim-soldiers

 

592 Muslim Graves at Douaumont near Sommes

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/5114930.stm

Muslim tombstones facing Mecca

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

592 Muslim Graves at Douaumont near Sommes, facing Mecca.

Commonwealth War Graves Commission

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Commonwealth War Graves Commission …

Below…Facebook link

https://www.facebook.com/commonwealthwargravescommission/ 
www.cwgc.org

 

Tanga New Memorial Built
 

A new war memorial commemorating almost 400 Indian and British soldiers who died during the First World War in Tanzania has been completed by a team of craftsmen from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) in time for Remembrance Day.

http://blog.cwgc.org/tanga

WW1 campaign in Africa enlisted the Punjabis (Sikh and Muslims), The Rajput, The KAR, Africans, The South African Coloureds, The Boers, The British, The Ethiopians, The Sudanese, Nubians, The Somali, The West Indians and many more. May all rest in peace!

Soldiers of the British Empire - Pakistan

http://historum.com/war-military-history/84962-soldiers-british-empire-pakistan.html

 

It is obvious that some people are suffering from amnesia or are pretending to be naïve over why there is hardly any coverage or lack of it, whatever the case may be during both WW1 and WW2 campaigns on the contributions carried out by African and Asian soldiers who took part during the WW1 and WW2 campaigns, which were either fought in their own back yard or had to serve abroad under and for the total benefits of their Colonial masters. In East Africa, our relatives were forced into joining the British Army and for that matter anyone else seen fit enough to join the campaign were dragged into it. Britain, altogether, mobilized about 1.5 million Indian soldiers during the war, of which about 90,000 were killed, 76,000 wounded, 100,000 carriers just alone, had died mostly of African back ground, no idea how many actually died/wounded in total. Some 150,000 Indian soldiers were deployed in Europe from September 1914 on. The overwhelming majority of Indian troops, however, fought in Mesopotamia against the Ottoman Empire. African troops fought as far as Asia.
Swedish author Jean Guillou wrote “where the lack of humanity and lack of treatment of own soldiers, wounded /sick soldiers were treated like cannon-fodder”. All those wounded and others soldiers who had served for the British were left abandoned and hardly remembered worldwide and still remains the case to this very day. Best of all, to them our forefathers were either second or third class citizens in their eyes.

 

My late great uncles told me, they were forced into fighting for the British, in fact they used to come door to door and grab anyone who seemed old enough. Can you imagine there were thousands of Indian soldiers killed as well as Africans in Tanga during the WW1 campaign against the Germans and their loved ones were never informed of their whereabouts for months only to be told months later that they were killed in Combat! To this very day, there has never been any memorial held nor soldiers killed ever mentioned or names held anywhere in memory. The injured Indian and African soldiers were discarded like fodder.

 

Jonathan Kruger I look after some of our Zambian World War 2 veterans of the Northern Rhodesia Regiment and Kings African Rifles. Most of them are in their 90s now living extreme poverty in their old age. Some were volunteers that joined while others told me they were taken by the British officers from their class rooms at school and from the markets. Didn’t even give them time to say good bye to families. Then sent off to train and prepare to fight in Ethiopia Madagascar Burma They later fought in Malaya in the 1950s against the Chinese Communist. It’s awesome to see all their medals they got from around the world. Some them still have their British uniforms. 

Muslim Boy Soldiers (World War) 

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Muslim Boy Soldiers (World War)

Jahan Mahmood


The slide I am discussing in this talk is the unknown story of Muslim Boy Soldiers, some of whom were 13/14 years old when they enlisted and some were forcibly conscripted into the British Indian Army. A large number of them died facing the German army and Imperial Japanese troops during the Second World War.

https://www.facebook.com/jahan.mahmood?fref=photo

400,000 Muslim Soldiers fought for Great Britain in the First World War

www.salaamail.com

How was India involved in the First World War?

 

'Almost 1.5 million Muslim, Sikh and Hindu men volunteered in the Indian Expeditionary Force.' Photo of members of a Waziri Khasadar, India, 1917-19 © 

Imperial War Museum.

https://www.britishcouncil.org/voices-magazine/how-was-india-involved-first-world-war

 

 

More than 400,000 Muslim soldiers fought in World War One ,

 

THEY are the forgotten heroes of the trenches, the brave men who gave their lives to the Empire but whose names have been erased from the history books.

More than 400,000 Muslim soldiers fought in World War One , yet a recent survey by British Future, a think-tank dedicated to racial integration, has revealed that only 22 per cent of people know of their sacrifice. 

http://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news/midlands-news/forgotten-army-400000-muslim-soldiers-10325190

 

Forgotten role of Indian soldiers who served in First World War marked at last

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/forgotten-role-of-indian-soldiers-who-served-in-first-world-war-marked-at-last-a6725851.html
 

The 'forgotten' army of 400,000 Muslim soldiers who fought in Great War trenches for Britain
 

http://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news/midlands-news/forgotten-army-400000-muslim-soldiers-10325190

 

The World War’s, The Forgotten Soldiers of the Empire

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04dh242

'Possibly' - the 129th Duke of Connaught's Own Baluchis infantry regiment on the outskirts of Wytschaete, Belgium during the Battle of Messines, October 1914. Baluchis

World War One Black and White photos that are researched and colourised in detail by Doug and other artists from the 'Colourisehistory Group'

 

https://www.facebook.com/WW1-Colourised-Photos-450822585061599/?fref=nf

 

Clickabove

The Royal Pavilion

 

The Royal Pavilion was the first Indian hospital to open in Brighton. The former palace, along with the Dome and Corn Exchange, were converted into a state of the art medical facility in less than two weeks. New plumbing and toilet facilities were established, and 600 beds were set up in new wards. X-ray equipment was installed, and the Great Kitchen became one of two operating theatres. The Pavilion’s first patients arrived in early December 1914. Over the following year, over 2,300 Indian patients were treated.

 

http://brightonmuseums.org.uk/royalpavilion/history/ww1-and-the-royal-pavilion/

WW1 campaign in Africa enlisted the Punjabis (Sikh and Muslims), The Rajput, The KAR, Africans, The South African Coloureds, The Boers, The British, The Ethiopians, The Sudanese, Nubians, The Somali, The West Indians and many more. May all rest in peace! rs came from the ian Subcontinent which Includes Modern Day India, Pakistan & Bangladesh.

 

World Wars

 

Asian contributions to both world wars are not widely known about, despite the fact that India raised the world’s largest volunteer armies: 1.5 million in WWI and 2.5 million in WWII. World War I marked an important watershed.

 

http://www.bl.uk/learning/histcitizen/asians/worldwars/theworldwars.html

 

Indian Army during World War I

The Indian Army during World War I contributed a number of divisions and independent brigades to the European, Mediterranean and the Middle East theatres of war in World War I. One million Indian troops would serve overseas, of whom 62,000 died and another 67,000 were wounded. In total 74,187 Indian soldiers died during the war.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Army_during_World_War_I

 

Istanbul and Indian Soldiers of the First World War - See more at:

http://amitavghosh.com/blog/?p=3752

 

India and World War One

India played a significant part in World War One. However, India’s part in the war is frequently overlooked as a result of the horrors experienced in trench warfare and by Europe’s tendency to home in on battles such as those fought at the Somme and Verdun, which many assume only Europeans fought in.

http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/india_and_world_war_one.htm

 

India and the Western Front

By Dr David Omissi

 

The Indian Corps in France

In August 1914, as the German Army advanced through France and Belgium, more Allied troops were desperately needed for the Western Front.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwone/india_wwone_01.shtml

 

World War I: UK announces search for families of 74,000 Indian soldiers who died fighting

 

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/uk/World-War-I-UK-announces-search-for-families-of-74000-Indian-soldiers-who-died-fighting/articleshow/20070529.cms

 

http://www.blackpresence.co.uk/category/black-history/black-soldiers-black-history/

 

http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/india_and_world_war_one.htm

 

 

 

Books:

Indian Voices of the Great War: Soldiers' Letters, 1914-1918: Soldiers' Letters, 1914-18 [Paperback]

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Indian-Voices-Great-War-1914-1918/dp/0333751450/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1402506276&sr=8-1-fkmr1&keywords=books+on+Volunteering+Indians+in+WW1+%26+WW2

The Indian Corps in France: During the First World War [Hardcover]

Sir Frederick Smith Bart

http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Indian-Corps-France-During/dp/8182743532/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1402511040&sr=8-1-fkmr0&keywords=books+on+Indians+during+WW1+%26+WW2

 

During World War I (1914–18), more than 200,000 Gurkhas served in the British Army, suffering approximately 20,000 casualties, and receiving almost 2,000 gallantry awards

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gurkha

WW1

http://peterbaxterafrica.com/index.php/2010/08/24/a-summary-of-the-east-africa-campaign-of-world-war-i/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BL_5.4-inch_howitzer

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-28519247

 

 

World War one photos

 

http://coolgallery.pics/index.php/World-War-I-in-Photos-The-Western-Front?utm_source=Taboola&utm_medium=referral&page=3

 

 

The 129th Duke of Connaught's Own Baluchis was an infantry regiment of the British Indian Army raised in 1846 as the 2nd Bellochee Battalion. It was designated as the 129th Duke of Connaught's Own Baluchis in 1903, and became 4th Battalion (Duke of Connaught's Own) 10th Baluch Regiment in 1922. In 1947, it was allocated to Pakistan Army, where it continues to exist as 11th Battalion of The Baloch Regiment.[1]

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/129th_Duke_of_Connaught%27s_Own_Baluchis

 

 

http://www.balochonline.com/en/129th-duke-of-connaughts-own-baluchis.html

 

 

 

THE GERMAN EAST AFRICA CAMPAIGN - 1914-1918
 

http://samilitaryhistory.org/vol066ed.html

 

http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/great-war-on-land/75-other-war-theatres/676-great-war-africa.html

 

“The Bridge Builders” Jean Guillou

 

Interesting and surprising! Brought to my attention by the book "The Bridgebuilders" by Swedish author Jean Guillou where the lack of humanity and lack of treatment of wounded and/or sick African soldiers, "cannon-fodder", by the British Forces is shocking cruel.

 

http://salomonssonagency.se/php/book.php?lang=en&bookid=208

 

Carrier Corps

The British Administration formed a military labour organisation, the Carrier Corps, which ultimately recruited or conscripted over 400,000 African men for porterage and other support tasks.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrier_Corps

 

The African soldiers dragged into Europe's war

More than one million people died in East Africa during World War One. Some soldiers were forced to fight members of their own families on the battlefield because of the way borders were drawn up by European colonial powers, writes Oswald Masebo.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-33329661

 

Kenya’s Nubians

 

http://nubiansinkenya.photoshelter.com/

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2W8MC55XDk&feature=youtu.be

 

 

Interesting articles on WW I in other parts of the world including two about Africa.

 

If you click on I Wonder under each story, there are further articles to be read.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-30098000

 

Tanzania: Race and Colonial War

More than one million people died in East Africa during WW1, as the British and German Empires battled each other away from the muddy fields of Europe. The war is all but forgotten in Tanzania,

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02ngjv6?ocid=socialflow_facebook

 

GENERAL PAUL VON LETTOW VORBECK’S EAST AFRICA CAMPAIGN:

 

http://www.africanafrican.com/folder14/alot%20more%20of%20african%20&%20african%20american%20history11/slavery/thesis%285%29%281%29.pdf

 

Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck I WHO DID WHAT IN WW1? 

 

 

African Contingents in the French Army

 

Between 1914 and 1918, the French deployed approximately 450,000 indigenous troops from Africa, including West Africans (so-called Tirailleurs Sénégalais), Algerians (so-called Turcos and Spahis), Tunisians, Moroccans, Malagasies, and Somalis, most of whom saw deployment in Europe. Settlers of European origin provided another 110,000 soldiers from North Africa (Chasseurs d’Afrique and Zouaves) and some of the 5,700 men in “créole” units from the old Senegalese cities and ports were also of European extraction. On the other hand, a suggestion made by Prime Minister Georges Clemenceau (1841–1929) in 1918 to hire up to 200,000 Ethiopian mercenaries never materialised.[2] Immediately after World War I French African troops would serve as occupation forces in the German Rhineland (1919 to 1930)[3] as well as in South Eastern Hungary (1919 to 1929)[4] and formed part of the Allied intervention in the Russian civil war (1918 to 1920).[5] ………….


Africans in Other European Armies

Unlike the French, the British were reluctant to deploy African troops in Europe. It is true that the British forces in the African and Middle Eastern campaigns included large numbers of African soldiers, and parts of the Indian Colonial Army were used in Europe from as early as autumn 1914 on. From 1916 on a campaign for a “million black army” following the French example was backed by several officers and politicians with colonial backgrounds, including Winston Churchill (1874–1965). But logistical issues, coupled with racist prejudices and opposition from colonial authorities in Africa, resulted in a renunciation of using such troops on European battlefields.[12] Non-white men were also banned from the “South African Overseas Expeditionary Force” that sent about 30,000 soldiers to France. Black and “coloured” men from the Union of South Africa served in Europe in the “South African Native Labour Contingent” (21,000 men), the “Cape Auxiliary Horse Transport” (2,800 men) and the “Cape Coloured Labour Corps” (1,200 men), all of them in unarmed ancillary roles.[13] However, a number of blacks resident in the United Kingdom managed to enlist in metropolitan British forces and some of them were even promoted to officer ranks. 

 

http://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/colonial_military_participation_in_europe_africa

The British (many from, KAR, the Indian Army, the South Africans) approached from Northern to down South, the Belgians (many from the Congo) from the West travelling Easterly direction, the Portuguese (many from Mozambique) travelling North Westerly direction, they were all offensively trailing the German’s in Von Lettow-Vorbeck all the way to the present day Zambian (Northern Rhodesia) and Tanzania (Tanganyika) border literally zig zagging all the way down to the Southern borders of Tanganyika and in the process defending in guerrilla style  war fare all the way down, therefore to be fair to  Von Lettow-Vorbeck for him to known what is happening in the rest of the theatre of war, would have been literary impossible. General von Lettow-Vorbeck was never defeated in battle, and only surrendered after learning about the Armistice in November 1918.  The British repatriated the white German soldiers but confined the Askaris in squalid camps.  General von Lettow-Vorbeck refused to leave until he had won promises of decent treatment and early release for his black troops.  

Returning to Germany as a national hero, von Lettow-Vorbeck became active in politics and tried to establish a conservative opposition to the Nazis.  He was able to bring some of his black officers with him to serve in the German Freikorps.  When Hitler offered him the ambassadorship to the Court of St. James’s in 1935, he “told Hitler to go fuck himself.”  Although repeatedly harassed by the Nazis, he survived their regime due to his popularity as a genuine hero of the old school.  

The old general never forgot his Askaris, and he returned to East Africa in 1953 where he was tearfully welcomed by his surviving soldiers.  Upon returning to Europe, he campaigned to provide for their welfare.  When von Lettow-Vorbeck died at the age of 93 in 1964, the West German government and the Bundeswehr flew in two former Askaris as state guests so that they could attend the funeral of “their” general.  A few months later, the old warrior’s fondest wish became reality when the West German Bundestag voted to deliver back pay to the 350 surviving Askaris in Africa.

A fitting way to say “f*ck you” to Hitler and Germany’s racist past.

http://timashby.com/the-german-general-who-told-hitler-to-go-screw-himself/

 

Koenigsberg gun 

Koenigsberg gun

MY REMINISCENCES OF EAST AFRICA

 

by General von Lettow-Vorbeck

 

http://www.allworldwars.com/My-Reminiscences-of-East-Africa-by-von-Lettow-Vorbeck.html

 

The hidden history of the sinking of the SS Mendi

 

How did it come about that hundreds of South African men — predominantly black, but some white — were sailing from Cape Town to Le Havre, France? Like many thousands of others from across the British Empire, they were travelling to support the war effort. Put simply, Britain and her allies were running out of people and supplies.

 

https://www.britishcouncil.org/voices-magazine/hidden-history-sinking-ss-mendi

 

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?/topic/176121-ss-mendi-210217/

 

2nd Kashmir Rifles 

HU 94495 Indian officers of the 2nd Kashmir Rifles with the German flag and machine gun captured in the Action at Lukigura River on 24 June 1916, during the advance to Morogoro. This photograph was taken at the regiment's depot at Satwari, Jammu, India on 16 June 1917, following their return from East Africa. The officers are: Back row (l to r): Jemadars Shah Wali, Naran Sing and Kalu, Subedars Ram Sing and Tekaram, Subedar Assistant Surgeon Abdul Kadli, Jemadars Naran Si and Bal Sing; Middle row (l to r): Subedars Bhaguran Sing, Umar Fulti and Sher Ali Khan, Major Hoskiar Sing, Lieutenant-Colonel Hadar Ali Khan, Lieutenant Nand Lal, Subedars Maidar Ali Khan, Nowal Sing and Kesri Sing; Front Row (l to r): Jemadars Tazir Din and Lal Sing, Subedars Pursud Sing, Milher Sing and Jemadars Ram Khan and Nadko.

KAR, Indian & Nigerian troops in Battle of Mahiwa.. German East Africa

The Battle of Mahiwa fought between German and British Imperial forces was a battle of the East African Campaign of World War I. The battle began when South African and Nigerian troops under Lieutenant General Jacob van Deventer engaged a column of German forces under the command of General Paul Emil von Lettow-Vorbeck at Mahiwa in German East Africa. The Germans were able to inflict massive casualties upon van Deventer's army, forcing it to withdraw. Despite the massive number of British casualties, the Germans also lost a large percentage of their forces and were ultimately forced to withdraw from their positions and continue their guerrilla war.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Mahiwa

 

http://archive.org/stream/cu31924027831860/cu31924027831860_djvu.txt

 

East African campaign

http://howafrica.com/legacy-world-war-africa/?utm_source=ReviveOldPost&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=ReviveOldPost

http://howafrica.com/visualhistory-askaris-east-africa-campaign/

 

East African Campaign (World War I)

The East African Campaign was a series of battles and guerrilla actions, which started in German East Africa and spread to portions of Mozambique, Northern Rhodesia, British East Africa, Uganda and the Belgian Congo. The campaign was effectively ended in November 1917.[7] The Germans entered Portuguese East Africa and continued the campaign living off Portuguese supplies.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_African_Campaign_%28World_War_I%29

 

The British West Indies Regiment

Caribbean troops of the 2nd West India Regiment.
Formation

The regular West India Regiment long pre-dated the Great War. Its 1st Battalion, based at Freetown, sent a detachment for service in German Cameroons. 2nd Battalion saw much service in the West and East African campaigns and then went to Palestine in September 1918.

http://www.1914-1918.net/britishwestindiesregiment.html

 

Click above

Aircraft in the German Colonies

After the Wright brothers historic flight in 1903 and later demonstrations in Europe, the military potential of manned aircraft was obvious to all the major powers. Yet it was only in early 1914 that Germany sent its first pilots and aeroplanes to the colonies. The First World War broke out a few short months after their arrival and they were pressed into action with little experience, no weapons and very few spare par

The Old and the Bold…Bukoba

Bukoba

22nd to 24th June 1915

Although the British Forces in East Africa had been ordered to the defensive {see British East Africa May to December 1915}, Major-General M. J. Tighe still considered it essential to undertake some form of offensive action, if only to restore the morale of his troops.  He made further representations to the War Office and finally obtained sanction to launch a minor offensive operation against a German outpost on Lake Victoria but only on the understanding that nothing would be undertaken that could lead to further complications.  Yet another blow to the already fragile British morale in East Africa was not to be risked.

http://www.25throyalfusiliers.co.uk/bukoba.html

Click above

Click on Photo, for more links on World War 1

Britain didn’t fight the second world war — the British empire did

http://www.spectator.co.uk/2015/07/britain-didnt-fight-the-second-world-war-the-british-empire-did/

 

Central Africa

In the late 19th Century Britain began to probe into Central Africa, both from the Indian Ocean through Portuguese East Africa and northwards from Southern Rhodesia. The motives for entering the region around Lake Nyasa, (declared the British Central African Protectorate in 1891 but later called Nyasaland and now named Malawi), were a mixture of public concern about the ruthless practices of Arab slavers as exposed by Doctor David Livingstone and other Scots Missionaries, and more pragmatic reasons of trade and commerce. At military headquarters in Zomba the Central Africa Rifles was stood-to and on 2nd January 1998 it marched across the border to reach Fort Jameson 16 days later. Captain H.E.J. Brake, Royal Artillery, was in command and he had with him six rifle companies of Africans, 118 Sikhs, Maxim Guns and two 7-pounder field guns. Each company was commanded by a British officer assisted by a Sikh colour sergeant and three Sikh sergeants. The guns were crewed by Africans under Sikh instructors. The remainder of the Sikhs formed their own rifle company.

http://www.kaiserscross.com/188001/214822.html

To assist him in this formidable task Johnston had a small force of seventy-one Indian soldiers from the 32nd and 23rd Sikh regiments and the Hyderabad Lancers, who had been seconded from the Indian Army for a three-year tour of service, and ten Swahili police. The force was commanded by Captain Cecil Maguire of the Indian Army, brother of the Rochefort Maguire who had helped Rudd to negotiate the Concession from Lobengula. Its armament consisted of Snider rifles, two 9-pounder and one 7-pounder cannon, and a Maxim gun. The cost of maintaining this force, up to a maximum of £10,000, was borne by the British South Africa Company. Cecil Rhodes, in pursuit of his dream for an all-red route from the Cape to Cairo, was as anxious as Johnston to bring peace to Nyasaland.

http://www.rhodesia.nl/slavery.html

Michael Bannerman

 

Michael Bannerman
Do you know who this is a photo of? Chances are you don’t, but don’t feel bad because probably not one American in one million does, and that is a National tragedy. His name is Eugene Jacques Bullard, and he is the first African-American fighter pilot in history. But he is also much more then that: He’s also a national hero, and his story is so incredible that I bet if you wrote a movie script based on it Hollywood would reject it as being too far-fetched.
WW 1 final.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [275.0 KB]

Perverted history: Europeans think US army liberated continent during WW2
 

http://rt.com/news/253753-europeans-wwii-victory-poll/

 

https://www.facebook.com/inthenow/videos/810711675745870/?hc_ref=NEWSFEED

 

World War two, over 60 million people were killed, which was about 3% of the 1940 world population (est. 2.3 billion). The tables below give a detailed country-by-country count of human losses. World War II fatality statistics vary, with estimates of total deaths ranging from 50 million to more than 80 million.

If one looks at the statistical figures compared to what is being actually displayed are in contrast to one another.
Without the USSR World War two would have been a totally different story altogether, yet we are made to believe that USA was the sole saviour is another myth that the Hollywood show biz have conjured up over time.
USSR lost 30 million of its people whilst Great Britain and USA put together lost about a million in total.
Another statement that is never ever highlighted is the fact that India lost over 2 million of its people and approximately tenth of what Great Britain and USA had lost in total (in Military deaths).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

India in World War II

 

The Indian Army began the war, in 1939, numbering just under 200,000 men. By the end of the war it had become the largest volunteer army in history, rising to over 2.5 million men in August 1945. Serving in divisions of infantry, armour and a fledgling airborne force, they fought on three continents in Africa, Europe and Asia.

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

An Indian infantry, 7th Rajput Regiment about to go on patrol on the Arakan front in Burma, 1944

British India (today known as India, Pakistan, Bangladesh) was controlled by Britain and thus India officially declared war on Nazi Germany in September 1939.[1] The British Raj, as a possession of Great Britain, formed part of the Allied Nations and sent over two million volunteer soldiers to fight under British command against the Axis powers. Additionally, several Indian Princely States provided large donations to support the Allied campaign during the War.[2] India also provided the base for American operations in support of China in the China Burma India Theater.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/India_in_World_War_II

 

WW2

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Army_during_World_War_II

 

 

All-India Muslim League

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All-India_Muslim_League

 

 

World War II is a case in point. The British Indian army was expanded to 2.5 million men under arms through calls for volunteers. It fought in Italy (yes), Africa, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia. Tens of thousands were killed, a similar number wounded, and more tens of thousands taken prisoner. The British decorated 4,000 of them for valor. These troops were made up of Hindus, Sikhs, Muslims (and probably some Buddhists). Punjabi and Baluch Muslims, who would now be termed Pakistanis, were prominent among them, as were Muslims from the Indian Princely states.

 

http://www.juancole.com/2014/06/remembering-muslim-fought.html

 

 

 

Indian Army during World War II

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

For other periods see Indian Army (1895–1947)

British Indian Army

 

Red Ensign of British India

Country

British Raj

Allegiance

British Crown

Type

Army

Size

2.5 million men in 1945

Part of

British Empire

Garrison/HQ

GHQ India (Delhi)

Commanders

Notable
commanders

Archibald Wavell, 1st Earl Wavell
Claude Auchinleck

The Indian Army began the war, in 1939, numbering just under 200,000 men.[1] By the end of the war it had become the largest volunteer army in history, rising to over 2.5 million men in August 1945.[1][2] Serving in divisions of infantry, armour and a fledgling airborne force, they fought on three continents in Africa, Europe and Asia.[1]

During The Second World War 2.5 million Soldiers came from the Indian Subcontinent which Includes Modern Day India & Pakistan. They Were Part Of The British Commonwealth Forces and the Largest All Volunteers Based Army with campaigns from 1939 to the surrender of Japan in 1945. However this army is all but forgotten very few people are aware of their contribution to the war effort.

 

http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?157120-British-Indian-Army-in-WW2

 

 

300 Indians recruited for King’s African Rifles

 

 

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=YbzsBPuhyggC&pg=PA71&lpg=PA71&dq=300+Indians+in+King%27s+African+Rifles&source=bl&ots=LiIjX9tJU4&sig=pHz019rJcXTljxO1zItBzFEGAx4&hl=en&sa=X&ei=JPa-U-mELsOqPNj8gegM&ved=0CCYQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=300%20Indians%20in%20King%27s%20African%20Rifles&f=false

 

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=__HNAwAAQBAJ&pg=PP28&lpg=PP28&dq=300+punjabis+recruited+KAR&source=bl&ots=hsYSgqxrNE&sig=-XU132qtT5g1OJozBNm9zBj4duE&hl=en&sa=X&ei=nrOeVPLrF4LVar6igIgI&ved=0CCEQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=128453

 

http://www.kaiserscross.com/188001/393901.html

 

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=YbzsBPuhyggC&pg=PA71&lpg=PA71&dq=300+Indians+in+King%27s+African+Rifles&source=bl&ots=LiIjX9tJU4&sig=pHz019rJcXTljxO1zItBzFEGAx4&hl=en&sa=X&ei=JPa-U-mELsOqPNj8gegM&ved=0CCYQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=300%20Indians%20in%20King%27s%20African%20Rifles&f=false

 

Battle of Surabaya

 

The Battle of Surabaya was fought between pro-independence Indonesian soldiers and militia against British and British Indian Troops as a part of the Indonesian National Revolution. The peak of the battle was in November 1945. The battle was the heaviest single battle of the revolution and became a national symbol of Indonesian resistance.[2] Considered a heroic effort by Indonesians, the battle helped galvanise Indonesian and international support for Indonesian independence. 10 November is celebrated annually as Heroes' Day (Hari Pahlawan).

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Surabaya

 

Muslim Imam Who Saved Thousands Of Jews From Nazis In Paris

Click on Photo

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Click on photo to Continue on to next page………..U-tube videos