Stephen Mill's Collections

 

 

Welcome
Welcome to the Mills Publishing Company. Here you may order for one of our available publications or pre-order those still in creation.

 

 

The Authors

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The Authors


Stephen Mills came to Kenya from Khartoum, Sudan in the early eighties and never left.

 

Following a career in the Royal Air Force, and a brief stint as a professional footballer, he flew operations as a commercial helicopter pilot that took him from supporting oil well drilling platforms in the frozen Canadian north, to chemical-vector control flight operations in Equatorial West Africa to control the fly that caused river-blindness.

 

http://www.millspublishing.com/

New book due out in October. 244 pages & 1,450 images of Kenya Pioneers...

 

africanscrapbook

Welcome to Africanscrapbook which features a Photographic Showcase of African History, Heritage and its People.

http://www.africanscrapbook.com/

Old Africa

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Old Africa

 

Old Africa comes out six times a year.  

As a subscriber, you will receive a copy in the mail, every time a new issue comes out.   

Please make sure to select the correct shipping destination from the drop down list before you click “Add to Cart.”

If you live in Kenya you can pay by cheque or money order made out in favour of:  Kifaru Educational and Editorial – Box 2338, Naivasha – 20117, Kenya

We also accept Safaricom Mpesa payments.  Our number is 0717636659

Make sure to follow up any Mpesa payments with an SMS to confirm name and address of subscriber.

http://oldafricamagazine.com/subscribe/

Hindustani Service ....Old Africa

Radio broadcasting began in what was then Kenya Colony in 1927 to relay news, a year later a regular service was started for the settlers. Kenya was one of the first British colonies to have a regular broadcast services.

Hindustani Service, C&W…. all began as a 15-minute interval during the regular services sometime in 1944. Initially operated from modest facilities at Memorial Hall on Delamere Avenue. Jagdish (Chui) Ahluwalia was the Indian announcer on this service. A 15 min window would only see through and play four songs per day.
Rudimentary makeshift studio, eight by eighth was not sound proof, so any small sound was also transmitted. Studio was linked to the control room by a small passage in it a small table for the announcer, a portable gramophone placed with some discs “His Master’s Voice” to some known as “Asli Kutta chap” records….

Assanands and  Shankardass two music stores in Nairobi would lend their latest songs and music records in an attempt to promoting their sales.

Later Hindustan services increased to three or four hours per day, by this time they had had enough funds to buy and own a collection of their own records.

Musa Ayub was only 20yrs old , when Jagdish Aluwalia invited him, soon after they had shifted  to new offices on Sclaters Road (Waiyaki Way) in Kabete next to the Prince of Wales School. Musa remained a radio/TV journalist for a period of at least 20 yrs.

Musa was the pioneer of the Hindustani Services in Kenya. Born in Kijabe, brought up in Ewaso Nyiro in Maasailand and in Kijabe, his education was assured by his uncle Haroon Ahmed, who actually started a Boarding School for them both in Kijabe and in Ewaso Nyiro.